During a Monday call with reporters, Alaska Senator Dan Sullivan says a Trade Customs Bill could help get more Alaska seafood into foreign markets.

“We’re working on, in that bill, that would dramatically increase market opportunities for our seafood. You know, Alaska is the super power of seafood, we harvest more seafood than the rest of the country combined, and that would go after the highly subsidized fishing fleets of foreign nations. And we’re encouraging the administration, in these trade agreements, to go after unfair subsidies for other fishing fleets.”

A robust forecast, followed by what first appeared to be a season gone bust in Bristol Bay, culminated with a run of wild sockeyes exceeding 50 million reds, and the price to fishermen sank.

"Everybody's concerned with the price," said Dave Harsila, president of the Alaska Independent Fishermen's Marketing Association, and a veteran Bristol Bay harvester. "I don't think anybody expected it to be that low, but that's what it is.

Two seafood industry trade associations have come to an agreement to transfer, effective for the 2016 season and beyond, ownership of the Marine Stewardship Council sustainability certificate for Alaska salmon.

The transfer announced July 21 by the Pacific Seafood Processors Association and the Alaska Salmon Processors Association is to be completed by Oct. 1.

The agreement will have no impact on sales for 2015.

Record-breaking temperatures along the coast of British Columbia will harm Pacific salmon for years to come, says the Fisheries Department.

Ocean scientist Ian Perry said the high temperatures were observed in the northeast Pacific Ocean during the fall of 2014 and 2015.

The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) has launched a new global fund for supporting critical fishery science research and projects aimed at strengthening knowledge and global capacity to assist small scale and developing world fisheries in their journey to achieving MSC certification.

A later-than-average surge of Bristol Bay sockeye harvesting is helping boost volumes in what has been a lackluster season, but catches still remain below the five-year average.

Based on historical trends, the fourth through seventh weeks of fishing provide the bulk of Bristol Bay sockeye catches, with a peak during the fifth week.

Fisherman/photographer Chris Miller is sending photos from the F/V Icy Bay via satphone to the folks at Bristol Bay Sockeye. These are some great photos of the Bristol Bay season unfolding.

In 2013, 38 percent of the salmon coming out of the bay was put into cans. But they aren’t flying off the shelves. LA Marketer Craig Caryl is working with the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute to change that.

“I think that canned salmon needs to be positioned with blueberries, literally, as a superfood," Caryl said.

He’s not the only one who wants to see a resurgence in canned salmon.

Alaska's first shellfish hatcheries could be its last, given the impact of growing ocean acidification, according to a new report published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE.

The research -- by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the University of Alaska and a shellfish hatchery -- found that in 25 years, Alaska’s coastal waters may not be able to support shellfish hatcheries unless costly new systems are put in place.

The chinook salmon situation is looking more hopeful in the early part of the 2015 season relative to recent years, though not yet in the places where better runs are most needed.

Early king salmon seem to be making a comeback from abysmal showings in the last two years. Key rivers in Southcentral Alaska are seeing returns to normalcy and in some cases returns to states unseen for the last 10 years. Even the hard luck Yukon River is experience stronger showings than the past couple years, although still far less than historic averages.