The April 8 opinion piece by Stosh Anderson, "Don Young seeks to unwind 'Alaska Model' for fisheries in Magnuson-Stevens Act," fails to represent the facts of the legislation I introduced to reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA).

The Alaska Board of Fisheries system -- to paraphrase Winston Churchill -- is the worst way to regulate fisheries, except for all the others.

Finding good employees for remote site work is always a challenge in rural Alaska, aggravating enough to make some managers move everything to Anchorage. But full-time year-round work remains the ideal, and one agency is giving it another shot.

A federal fisheries agency office is reopening in Unalaska as soon as three enforcement officers are hired and trained, according to Kevin Heck, acting deputy special agent in charge in Anchorage.

BBRSDA board president Fritz Johnson announced today that Sue Aspelund is resigning her position as the association’s executive director effective May 15, 2015. Aspelund will continue as BBRSDA’s fiscal officer through the end of July in order to ensure a smooth transition as a new executive director is brought on board.

The board has formed a recruitment and hiring committee to begin the process of selecting an interim or permanent executive director.

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council will hold its second meeting of 2015 from April 8-14 at the Anchorage Hilton.

The council’s biggest agenda item will be final action on measures to reduce chinook and chum salmon bycatch in the Bering Sea pollock fishery. The alternatives, introduced for public review in December 2014, include both voluntary and regulatory controls to shorten seasons, provide incentives, and reduce bycatch caps.

A lot has changed in Alaska since commercial vessels began fishing for halibut off the coastline in 1888, but in almost 130 years, halibut has remained a staple of the state’s fishing economy and culture. Along with salmon and crab, no species of fish captures the Alaska imagination and fills Alaska pocketbooks more than halibut.

Legislation by Rep. Bryce Edgmon, D- Dillingham, to establish Alaska Wild Salmon Day annually on Aug. 10, is moving through the House, co-sponsored by Representatives Bob Herron, D-Bethel, and Mike Chenault, R-Nikiski.

Egmon's bill would celebrate the enormous bounty that wild king, sockeye, coho, chum and pink salmon bring to Alaska every year.
- See more at: http://www.thecordovatimes.com/article/1513saluting-salmon#sthash.pOTTGb...

Alaska Congressman Don Young has introduced a bill to reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the nation’s primary law governing fishing in federal waters. It leaves fisheries managers some controversial wiggle room.

Previous versions of the law established eight regional councils and required them to set harvest limits based on science to end overfishing. The mechanism is known as the “Alaska Model” of fisheries management.

JUNEAU -- Gov. Bill Walker has made a second try at filling a vacant seat on the Alaska Board of Fisheries, this time picking the director of a Kenai Peninsula conservation group for a position traditionally held by members sympathetic to sportfishing interests.

This year marks 40 years since the passage of landmark Congressional legislation that fundamentally overhauled how the $90 billion U.S. commercial fisheries industry is managed. It established a unique public-private partnership in which the industry, working with scientists and both federal and local authorities, would regulate fishing according to agreed-upon scientific standards for environmental sustainability, even as the industry stretched to meet skyrocketing demand for seafood.