After a lengthy search, the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association has a new executive director set to start in December.

The organization, which is funded by a tax on drift fishermen, announced Nov. 12 that Becky Martello would take the top job beginning Dec. 14.

Martello replaces Sue Aspelund, who said last spring that she'd like to resign from the position after holding it for about a year.

Federal regulators on Thursday approved a genetically engineered salmon as fit for consumption, making it the first genetically altered animal to be cleared for American supermarkets and dinner tables.
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The approval by the Food and Drug Administration caps a long struggle for AquaBounty Technologies, a small company that first approached the F.D.A. about approval in the 1990s. The agency made its initial determination that the fish would be safe to eat and for the environment more than five years ago.

Next year promises to be a big year for sockeye harvests. Both Bristol Bay and Upper Cook Inlet are forecast to have sizable sockeye returns in the midst of global and domestic market hostile to U.S. higher sockeye prices detailed in a new economic report.

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) has compiled preliminary figures for the 2015 commercial salmon harvest and harvest value. The total 2015 statewide commercial salmon harvest was 263.5 million fish, and was comprised of 474,000 Chinook salmon, 15.2 million chum salmon, 3.6 million coho salmon, 190.5 million pink salmon, and 54 million sockeye salmon. Overall, this represents the second largest salmon harvest on record, and was exceeded only by the record harvests of 2013.

A commercial fishing trade organization is donating 300 pounds of sockeye salmon to the Kenai Senior Center.

The first 50 pounds of the donation from Alaska Salmon Alliance arrived at the center Wednesday, The Peninsula Clarion reports.

The salmon meal was originally suggested by Kenai senior Howard Hill, who secured the donation from the Salmon Alliance, said senior center director Rachael Craig.

A USDA bailout will send thousands of cans of Bristol Bay sockeye to school lunches and other federal food programs around the country this winter.

The iconic Alaska chinook salmon has unequaled world-renown for big fish tales.

The largest fish on record, a 97-pounder pulled from the Kenai River in 1985, changed the focus of the Alaska fishing economy, bringing in waves of fish tourists and seeding the politically influential guided angler industry.

Since then, the chinook, or king, salmon across the state have been getting smaller, researchers have found.

Kodiak’s pink salmon harvest set a new record, with total landings of 31,332,300 through Monday. That surpasses the parent year of this year’s run, which had a catch of 28.16-million in 2013.

In the surrounding areas the catch was even more impressive. Prince William Sound fishermen alone have harvested 97-million, which is 6-million more than their 2013 record year.

A new federal fisheries report documents the lasting cardiac impact on pink salmon and herring embryos exposed to crude oil from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound.

Trolling for salmon is a big business for many fishermen in Southeast Alaska. But this summer was a bit unusual. More effort was put into catching Chum salmon than Coho and fishermen only had one shot at Kings.