Record-breaking temperatures along the coast of British Columbia will harm Pacific salmon for years to come, says the Fisheries Department.

Ocean scientist Ian Perry said the high temperatures were observed in the northeast Pacific Ocean during the fall of 2014 and 2015.

The 2015 fishery summed up? Odd, confusing, unique, strange. Or that's what fishermen and managers are telling us. Their take on 2015, fish numbers and other news, plus - how do you survive a Bristol Bay romance?

Statewide catches of wild Alaska salmon jumped from an estimated total of 20.3 million fish on July 7 to 53.5 million fish on July 14, lifting the spirits of harvesters in what has been a disconcerting season.

Biologists with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game noted that the late run of the run into Bristol Bay was showing strength, along with an increase in the average size of the sockeyes.

"The fishery has picked up substantially," said David Harsila, of Seattle, president of the Alaska Independent Fishermen's Marketing Association.

Bristol Bay lived up to its reputation for unpredictability as a bizarre late rush of sockeyes has surged into fishermen’s nets nearly a week past the historical peak, with enough still coming to potentially surpass the 20-year average harvest by several million fish.

“Things change,” said Chuck Brazil, assistant area biologist for Bristol Bay. “That’s why we manage the fishery day to day.”

A later-than-average surge of Bristol Bay sockeye harvesting is helping boost volumes in what has been a lackluster season, but catches still remain below the five-year average.

Based on historical trends, the fourth through seventh weeks of fishing provide the bulk of Bristol Bay sockeye catches, with a peak during the fifth week.

What's the story of the Port Moller Test Fishery this year? Perplexing to the very end says analyst Scott Raborn.

This summer’s weak run of Yukon River king salmon will likely fall short of the tepid projections set before the season began, according to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

As of Thursday, the Pilot Station sonar project on the Lower Yukon had counted roughly 112,000 king salmon. A majority of Chinooks have migrated upstream already, a news release stated.

Fisherman/photographer Chris Miller is sending photos from the F/V Icy Bay via satphone to the folks at Bristol Bay Sockeye. These are some great photos of the Bristol Bay season unfolding.

More strong showings in Nushagak and the Naknek-Kvichak districts, and processors are getting plugged.

Five weeks into the Bristol Bay sockeye salmon fishery, with a preseason harvest forecast of 40.5 million fish, the estimated catch was climbing ever so slowly, as fishermen and processors waited it out.

As of July 6, biologists with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game were estimating the total Bristol Bay harvest to date at 9.1 million salmon, and the statewide catch of salmon at 20 million fish.