Just over 10 years ago, a ship carrying soybeans went aground in Makushin Bay on Unalaska Island in the Aleutian Chain during a big storm.

Air Station Kodiak responded with a Jayhawk helicopter along with the cutter Alex Haley. Through the wind and squalls and approaching darkness, the Coast Guard worked to get the crew of the Selendang Ayu off the boat.

What do all those photos without corals in the depths of the Bering Sea really mean? Corals, sponges and sea whips in the Bering Sea were photographed last summer by federal fisheries scientists, in the vast underwater canyons where the continental shelf drops to deep ocean depths.

The coming year should prove a lucrative year for Alaska fisheries, even in the face of the doom and gloom surrounding the chinook salmon declines and a sketchy halibut situation.

The largest volume fishery, pollock, and the most valuable fishery, salmon, both have positive forecasts and large projected harvests; escapements for Alaska’s iconic king salmon were largely achieved in 2014; and various regulatory bodies have a full schedule to deal with both hurting and flourishing stocks.

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council voted unanimously Dec. 13 to amend several alternatives to reduce the chinook and chum salmon bycatch in the eastern Bering Sea pollock fishery.

The council is looking for chum bycatch reductions both by new measures and using existing management aimed at minimizing chinook salmon bycatch.

Americans eat more seafood than just about anyone else. Most of it is imported from abroad. And a lot of it — perhaps 25 percent of wild-caught seafood imports, according to fisheries experts — is illegally caught.

The White House is now drafting recommendations on what to do about that. Fisheries experts say they hope the administration will devote more resources to fight seafood piracy.

A struggle in Alaska over shrinking supplies of halibut is threatening the iconic centerpiece fish in favor of cheaper exports, fast-food fillets and fish sticks.

If expected cuts are made in January, halibut fishing could be over in the Bering Sea west of Alaska, the source of one-sixth of halibut caught in the United States. That catch includes most of the frozen supply that sustains restaurants, food-service companies and retail stores nationwide, such as Costco and Whole Foods.

Seattle seafood company Trident Seafood Corporation has signed a letter of intent to buy the assets of Kodiak's Western Alaska Fisheries. The transaction will be finalized Dec. 31, 2014.

Trident controls harvesting, processing, and marketing. Western Alaska Fisheries assets include a Kodiak processing plant for cod, salmon, and pollock among other species.

The Bering Sea red king crab fleet finished catching 10 million pounds of quota last week — and they’re facing some lackluster prices as the crab goes to market. It could be due to higher catch limits in Alaska and Russia.

NOAA Fisheries is publishing a final rule to implement Steller sea lion protection measures for fisheries in the Aleutian Islands, effective December 26, 2014.

Steller sea lions that primarily occur west of 144 degrees W longitude in Alaska are listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Atka mackerel, Pacific cod, and pollock are the primary prey species for Steller sea lions in the Aleutian Islands. Fisheries for these three species also provide a living for fishermen and communities in the Aleutian Islands.

South Korean officials expressed fear of a huge death toll after rescuers Monday failed to find any of the more than 50 fishermen missing after their vessel sank amid high waves in frigid waters of the western Bering Sea.

One Korean crew member was confirmed dead and 52 others remain missing. Eight people made it into a lifeboat, including the one who later died. A nearby fishing vessel rescued them.