The North Pacific Fishery Management Council will hold its second meeting of 2015 from April 8-14 at the Anchorage Hilton.

The council's biggest agenda item will be final action on measures to reduce chinook and chum salmon bycatch in the Bering Sea pollock fishery. The alternatives, introduced for public review in December 2014, include both voluntary and regulatory controls to shorten seasons, provide incentives, and reduce bycatch caps.

BBRSDA board president Fritz Johnson announced today that Sue Aspelund is resigning her position as the association’s executive director effective May 15, 2015. Aspelund will continue as BBRSDA’s fiscal officer through the end of July in order to ensure a smooth transition as a new executive director is brought on board.

The board has formed a recruitment and hiring committee to begin the process of selecting an interim or permanent executive director.

A new study in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences suggests that increased abundance of pink salmon in the North Pacific Ocean is linked to declining trends in sockeye salmon populations.

A lot has changed in Alaska since commercial vessels began fishing for halibut off the coastline in 1888, but in almost 130 years, halibut has remained a staple of the state’s fishing economy and culture. Along with salmon and crab, no species of fish captures the Alaska imagination and fills Alaska pocketbooks more than halibut.

Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association (BBRSDA) made public the resignation of president and founding member Robert Heyano in a release on Wednesday "with sincere regret."

The sockeye escapement goals for most of Bristol Bay’s rivers are changing. Members of an 18 month study recommended widening the ranges rather than just raising them, and the Department of Fish and Game has now adopted those ranges. Then the Alaska Board of Fish added language requiring management for the low end of escapement on small run years, and the high end during years with bigger runs.

Wild Alaska salmon processed into a powder is a work in progress of the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, in an effort to market millions of pounds of the fish, while providing protein to hungry people worldwide.

Nutritionists contracted by ASMI are currently concentrating on making the salmon powder as “sensory neutral” as possible, said Bruce Schactler, of Kodiak, who heads up ASMI’s global food aid program.

Another election cycle is underway for the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association, with two candidates each vying for the Alaska resident and non-Alaska resident seats respectively.

Ballots went out on March 11 to the Bristol Bay drift gillnet permit holders represented by the association. To be counted as votes, they had to be postmarked by April 10 and received by the BBRSDA by April 17.

Alaska Congressman Don Young has introduced a bill to reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the nation’s primary law governing fishing in federal waters. It leaves fisheries managers some controversial wiggle room.

Previous versions of the law established eight regional councils and required them to set harvest limits based on science to end overfishing. The mechanism is known as the “Alaska Model” of fisheries management.

The Aleutian Marketplace contest was designed to gather ideas and provide funding for new start-up businesses around the Bering Sea.

As the competition heads into its second round, one winner is asking for extra support -- and a chance to turn his recipe for success into the real thing. KUCB’s Lauren Rosenthal reports....