The Alaska Independent Fishermen’s Marketing Association (AIFMA) applauds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for its Watershed Assessment of impacts of potential large scale mining in the Bristol Bay drainages of Alaska. The Assessment is thorough, peer-reviewed, and comprehensive. It describes the risks of unavoidable, adverse, cumulative effects of potential large mines, including Pebble mine, on fish, wildlife, and subsistence, commercial and recreational fisheries in the region.

Robert Heyano, President of the Board of Directors of the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association, announced today that the board has accepted the resignation of its executive director, Bob Waldrop, who has served in that capacity since inception of the association. The board wishes Bob well in his next endeavors.

House Republicans are calling for an investigation into whether the Environmental Protection Agency planned to kill a controversial Alaska copper-and-gold mine from its inception, according to documents obtained by the Washington Examiner.

The EPA last month moved toward issuing a preemptive veto of a key mining permit for the proposed Pebble Mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska. The agency said the mine would destroy salmon runs that are home to nearly half the world's sockeye salmon, and would disrupt the lives of native tribes.

A federal agency is providing more time for the state and the group behind the proposed Pebble Mine to provide information showing development at the site would not result in "unacceptable" environmental impacts.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has initiated a process that could lead to it prohibiting or restricting development of a massive gold-and-copper prospect in the Bristol Bay region.

A new report shows that Bristol Bay produced 31-percent of the world’s commercially caught sockeye salmon last year. That’s down significantly from previous years. The new “Sockeye Market Analysis” report was prepared by the McDowell Group for the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has started a process that could block the world’s largest open-pit copper mine ever proposed and protect the Pacific Ocean’s most productive source of wild salmon.

A rarely used section of the Clean Water Act allows the EPA to prohibit or restrict activities that deposit fill material into wetlands or waterways, if such activities harm fisheries. The agency has more than sufficient cause to intervene in a proposed mining operation in southwest Alaska.

Dubbed “The Silencing Alaskans Act” by an environmental lobby which has accused the state administration of trying to subvert the public comment process for permit approval, and slammed by some Native groups as undermining traditional rights to water use, the bill would allow the administration to issue general permits for some resource development activities, would make some changes to the law relating to appeals over agency permitting decisions and would also change the law relating to the reservation or sale of water in the state.

On Wednesday, controversial house bill 77 will be back before the Senate Resources Committee.

It has undergone some revisions, but one thing that has not changed, at least yet, is language authorizing a feasibility study for a dam at Chikuminuk Lake in the Wood Tikchik State Park.

The Chikuminuk Dam project has itself been controversial since it was introduced to the public in the spring of 2012.

On Wednesday, controversial house bill 77 will be back before the Senate Resources Committee.

It has undergone some revisions, but one thing that has not changed, at least yet, is language authorizing a feasibility study for a dam at Chikuminuk Lake in the Wood Tikchik State Park.

The Chikuminuk Dam project has itself been controversial since it was introduced to the public in the spring of 2012.

For the first time, Bristol Bay sockeye salmon will be featured at Seafood Expo North America (formerly the International Boston Seafood Show), taking place March 16th – 18th in Boston, MA.