Bristol Bay lived up to its reputation for unpredictability as a bizarre late rush of sockeyes has surged into fishermen’s nets nearly a week past the historical peak, with enough still coming to potentially surpass the 20-year average harvest by several million fish.

“Things change,” said Chuck Brazil, assistant area biologist for Bristol Bay. “That’s why we manage the fishery day to day.”

A later-than-average surge of Bristol Bay sockeye harvesting is helping boost volumes in what has been a lackluster season, but catches still remain below the five-year average.

Based on historical trends, the fourth through seventh weeks of fishing provide the bulk of Bristol Bay sockeye catches, with a peak during the fifth week.

What's the story of the Port Moller Test Fishery this year? Perplexing to the very end says analyst Scott Raborn.

This summer’s weak run of Yukon River king salmon will likely fall short of the tepid projections set before the season began, according to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

As of Thursday, the Pilot Station sonar project on the Lower Yukon had counted roughly 112,000 king salmon. A majority of Chinooks have migrated upstream already, a news release stated.

Fisherman/photographer Chris Miller is sending photos from the F/V Icy Bay via satphone to the folks at Bristol Bay Sockeye. These are some great photos of the Bristol Bay season unfolding.

A massive cleanup effort is getting underway in Alaska, with tons of marine debris — some likely sent to sea by the 2011 tsunami in Japan — set to be airlifted from rocky beaches and taken by barge for recycling and disposal in the Pacific Northwest.

More strong showings in Nushagak and the Naknek-Kvichak districts, and processors are getting plugged.

Five weeks into the Bristol Bay sockeye salmon fishery, with a preseason harvest forecast of 40.5 million fish, the estimated catch was climbing ever so slowly, as fishermen and processors waited it out.

As of July 6, biologists with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game were estimating the total Bristol Bay harvest to date at 9.1 million salmon, and the statewide catch of salmon at 20 million fish.

In 2013, 38 percent of the salmon coming out of the bay was put into cans. But they aren’t flying off the shelves. LA Marketer Craig Caryl is working with the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute to change that.

“I think that canned salmon needs to be positioned with blueberries, literally, as a superfood," Caryl said.

He’s not the only one who wants to see a resurgence in canned salmon.

In another hurdle for Royal Dutch Shell’s Arctic drilling program, an ice-handling vessel playing a key role in the operation has returned to Dutch Harbor after a gash was discovered in its hull.

The Fennica, a 380-foot Finnish vessel, was damaged Friday as it headed for the drilling grounds in the Chukchi Sea off the northwest Alaska coast, with a state-certified marine harbor pilot on board handling it. The vessel is one of 29 Shell plans to send to the area this summer.