The proposed open-pit copper and gold Pebble Mine will not be built, according to billionaire mining financier Robert Friedland.

"The United States Environmental Protection Agency has just killed the Pebble Mine in Alaska. It will not be built," Friedland said Wednesday during a presentation at the Sprott Natural Resource Symposium Vancouver.

Last Friday, the EPA suggested it might invoke a little used provision that may block the mine's construction.

One of the most prestigious colleges in the United States is using Bristol Bay’s massive salmon fishery as a teaching tool. KDLG’s Mike Mason has the story.

The Regulatory Certainty Act of 2014 has received an approval vote from the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. The bill, introduced in June by Ohio Congressman Bob Gibbs, curbs the Environmental Protection Agency’s authority under section 404(c) of the Clean Water Act. Specifically, it would prohibit the EPA from halting a project before the environmental permitting process begins, like what happened with the proposed Pebble mine, and limit the period of consultation to a minimum of 30 days.

Today the U.S. EPA released its proposed determination in the Clean Water Act 404(c) process, issuing draft protections for the Bristol Bay watershed related to the proposed Pebble Mine.

Supporters of the embattled Pebble Mine project in Alaska are making a desperate effort in Congress and the courts to keep it alive in the face of warnings from the Environmental Protection Agency that it could devastate the finest run of wild salmon left on the globe.

Members of the U.S. House of Representatives are pushing a bill to keep the EPA from blocking the mine, despite opposition from Washington state lawmakers who say the project could be devastating to the fishing industry in their state.

An advance sockeye price of $1.20 a pound has been posted at Bristol Bay by Alaska General Seafoods, with an extra 15 cents for chilled fish. Other processors are likely to match, according to reports from the Alaska Independent Fishermen’s Marketing Association. That compares to a base price of $1.50 a pound for Bristol Bay reds last year. The Bay catch yesterday was approaching 28 million sockeyes, 11 million more than forecasted and the fish are still coming.

The United Tribes of Bristol Bay recently announced it would intervene in a lawsuit filed by the Pebble Limited Partnership against the EPA’s use of its Clean Water Act authority in order to stop development of the proposed Pebble Mine. The group of tribes announced the move to help protect the strength of the clean water act. Heather Kendall-Miller is the Senior Staff Attorney for the Native American Rights Fund, which represents the tribal organization.

Sockeye catches through the Port Moller Test Fishery dropped off a bit on Wednesday compared to the huge catches recorded on Tuesday. 136-sockeye were caught on Wednesday. The catch at station 2 was 32-sockeye. That’s the largest daily catch of the season at that station.

This year’s sockeye run to Bristol Bay has exceeded the preseason forecast and 2 of the organizations that follow the run are projecting that there are several million fish still to come.

The world’s biggest sockeye salmon run is expected to surge into Bristol Bay any day, where a catch of about 17 million reds is projected. Elsewhere, the annual summer troll fishery in Southeast Alaska kicks off on July first with a target of just over 166,000 chinook salmon.

Lots of crab fisheries are underway each summer — dungeness fishing began on June 15 in Southeast where a harvest of 2.25 million pounds is expected. The region’s golden king crab fishery will close on July 10, with a catch of about 234,000 pounds.